Culture

Review: no visible bruises: what we don’t know about domestic violence can kill us

Snyder shines the light primarily on the American justice system as she breaks her book down into three sections “The End”, “The Beginning” and “The Middle”, which explore how we come to know about domestic abuse and how it can be born.

8 September 2020
Review: The Woman Who Cracked the Anxiety Code

Judith Hoare: The Woman Who Cracked the Anxiety Code: The Extraordinary Life of Dr Claire Weekes Scribe Publications, 2020. ISBN, 9781922310439, pp. 416, $29.99   Face, accept, float, let time pass. This was the six-word mantra that gave hundreds of thousands of people control over their anxiety. Australian journalist Judith Hoare chronicles the fascinating life of […]

7 September 2020
Review: The Pact – A Slow-Burn Mystery for the Zoom Era

Bitten By Production’s 2020 theatrical season was one of the many creative casualties of the COVID-19 pandemic. Not to be stymied by the lockdown performance drought, the company has produced a 14-episode miniseries instead, bringing together a team of emerging writers to create a compelling story from isolation. The episodes are punchy and short, telling […]

4 September 2020
Review: Something That May Shock and Discredit You

Daniel M. Lavery: Something That May Shock and Discredit You Scribe Publications, 2020. ISBN, 9781922310040, pp. 256, $29.99   Something That May Shock and Discredit You is a work that is incredibly comforting for a trans reader. It is, at its heart, a sincere exercise in reckoning with what ‘trans’ is, for a trans person, […]

20 August 2020
Review: We Are Family: what really matters for parents and children

Susan Golombrok: We are family: what really matters for parents and children Scribe Publications, 2020. ISBN, 9781925713701pp. 320 , $32.99   Professor Susan Golombrok has spent years researching families and how they have changed in the 21st century. From queer couples being able to adopt to Kim Kardashian surrogacies, Golombrok packages her learnings into a […]

30 July 2020
‘Feeling’ Zachary Leo’s New Sound

In today’s age where the majority of mainstream music is filled with mind-numbing beats, Zachary Leo’s sound is a breath of fresh air. The 21-year-old Melbourne based artist began his journey in 2019 releasing the singles She and Lay You Down, and more recently released the extremely catchy single Not That Easy. Fresh off a […]

28 July 2020
Review: Henry Green’s ‘Half Light’ feels like waking up on a day off

Suffice to say that in the Year of Our Lord 2020, we’ve all had our fair share of emotional rollercoasters. There are moments when you feel inspired and in control, there are other moments when you feel anything but. Sometimes, it’s almost like you’re sleepwalking. From his attic studio, dream pop artist Henry Green has […]

6 July 2020
Review: Partition Voices

Bari is the Bengali word for one’s ancestral home; it is your desh, the place that always holds an important key to understanding who you are. For those uprooted – and often traumatised, as the people in this series of true stories often are – the idea of bari is a confusing one…

16 May 2020
Review: Goodbye, Elton John

This concert was 50 years in the making, and my goodness did it exceed my highly-set expectations! 
After performing in Melbourne multiple times throughout his long and successful career, Sir Elton John took his last bow on a Melbourne stage on Sunday 15th December. This 150th show of his Farewell Yellow Brick Road Tour was performed at a packed Rod Laver Arena, full to the brim of fans who were eagerly awaiting the chance to see Elton perform one last time.

17 March 2020
Review: The Hitmen

As a satire of job-hunting hell, The Hitmen struggles to strike its target. Nonetheless, Mish Wittrup’s new play offers some gory chuckles and a suite of energetic performances.

17 March 2020
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