Books

Review: Clunes Booktown Festival

There really is nothing like the look and feel of a good book: you can smell the authenticity of each page, and feel the creases and textures in the paper. This love of books is the reason that Clunes Booktown Festival is now in its 11th year, and still going strong.

29 May 2017
Review: My Feet Are Hungry

Released in 2014 and marking author Chris Wallace-Crabbe’s eightieth birthday, My Feet Are Hungry could have easily been underwhelming and less astute than his earlier works. But even at the release of his twenty-fourth collection of poetry, Wallace-Crabbe has managed to retain his wit and skill. His work seems fresh: intelligent and thought-provoking as always, […]

3 April 2017
Review: Ken’s Quest

Cher Chidzey’s novel, Kens Quest, takes the reader on a journey with Ken, a Chinese immigrant who travels to Australia to start a new life. The novel explores the challenges and trials that come with migration through Ken’s struggle to obtain permanent residency due to his status as an ‘illegal’ immigrant. The novel explores the ways people from different cultures […]

13 March 2017
Review: Gender and Allegory in the Alchemist

To say that The Alchemist (1988) is popular would be an understatement. The jacket of my copy proclaims that Paulo Coelho’s novel has sold 65 million copies worldwide “touching the minds and hearts of his readers”. I think the reason it’s so successful is its combination of a simple narrative and concealed allegorical meaning. The […]

6 February 2017
The Fate of Over-Beloved Bookstores

Stephanie looks into whether bookstores can survive in the modern era.

16 May 2016
On Time Capsules

My uncle built me a bookshelf for my fifth birthday. Huon pine with miniature toadstool carvings, it towered above me and spanned the entire bedroom wall.

9 May 2016
Review: Men

I picked up Men because the blurb proclaimed it to be an exploration of ‘female desire’. I was expecting irony. I was disappointed.

Review: The Argonauts

The Argonauts details her experiences of being a step-parent, giving birth and sharing with her partner in their grief after their mother’s death.

4 May 2016
88 Lines about 44 Books

In honour of World Book Day, Emme Michelle writes an ode to 44 books that changed the world.

23 April 2016
Review: What the Light Hides

Mette Jakobsen’s second novel, What the Light Hides, is equal parts lovely, sensory, and frustrating.

1 April 2016
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