Film

Review: A Delicate Fire

A Delicate Fire is an operatic movie filmed under COVID-safe conditions by Pinchgut Opera, using the music of 17th century Venetian composer Barbara Strozzi. It is an exploration of romantic love, using Strozzi’s music as inspiration.

28 November 2020
Fame: It’s A Numbers Game — A Review of Spree (2020)

Spree’s central thesis is that we are all desperate to be seen. Whether by our parents, friends or random strangers on the internet, we want the validation and acknowledgment of others. This incredibly human trait pivots towards the horrific in Spree, a splattery thriller for the digital age, directed by Eugene Kotlyarenko and executive-produced by Drake.

Review: Citizen K

Citizen K, directed and written by Alex Gibney, tells a side of the Cold War story that is arguably more interesting, and indeed more deadly, than the war itself: how does a nation with a communist backbone going back centuries suddenly make the transition to capitalism? How do its citizens get by? How does the government and its laws catch up to such an upheaval?

3 March 2020
Review: The Professor and the Madman

In a constantly changing linguistic and cultural landscape Mel Gibson’s passion project based on the unique history of the Oxford English Dictionary, should have had no trouble capturing the modern zeitgeist. Unfortunately, in a production marred by chaos, lawsuits and general disfunction, The Professor and the Madman is a film left feeling hollow and unfinished.

25 February 2020
Review: Like A Boss @ Moonlight Cinema

Like A Boss had the potential to be a huge comedy hit because of its star-studded cast and emphasis on female empowerment, but it failed to do so. Starring Tiffany Haddish and Rose Byrne as best friends and Salma Hayek as the antagonist, the film heavily relies on innuendos and slapstick comedy in an attempt to be funny.

Review: DreamWorks Animation: The Exhibition

Beginning as a celebration of the studio’s 20th anniversary, the collection of creative works on display has grown with each new film released in the late 2010’s, culminating in a behind-the-scenes peak at 37 animated features. Unlike a theme-park or premiere event, where the emphasis is placed upon the visitor and their interactions with film characters, DreamWorks Animation: The Exhibition is very much a celebration of the filmmakers and creative processes behind each film.  

12 February 2020
Review: The Lighthouse

The Lighthouse takes inspiration from Edgar Allen Poe’s work to create a dark, filthy and perversely comedic chamber piece of hallucination and repression. A hyper-stylised aesthetic plunges viewers into the eerie, miserable atmosphere of a remote island in 1890s New England.

7 February 2020
Review: A Beautiful Day in the Neighbourhood

A Beautiful Day in the Neighbourhood arrives in the midst of yet another tepid Oscar season, squashed within a crowded line-up of adapted true stories, including the downfall of Roger Ailes (Bombshell [2020]), the denouement of Judy Garland’s career (Judy [2019]), and some cars going vroom vroom very fast (Ford v Ferrari [2019]).

30 January 2020
Review: How accurate is the film Bombshell?

Bombshell succeeds at a lot of things: incredible prosthetics and makeup, captivating audiences while evoking intense emotion, and using clever wordplay in the title of the film. The movie follows three blonde “bombshells” through the challenges and devastation of sexual harassment which ultimately ends in a different kind of bombshell.

Review: 1917

Sam Mendes’ epic one-take war film is an indelible, commanding experience built on some of the most incredible craftsmanship that cinema can offer.

8 January 2020
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