Review

Review: We Are Family: what really matters for parents and children

Susan Golombrok: We are family: what really matters for parents and children Scribe Publications, 2020. ISBN, 9781925713701pp. 320 , $32.99   Professor Susan Golombrok has spent years researching families and how they have changed in the 21st century. From queer couples being able to adopt to Kim Kardashian surrogacies, Golombrok packages her learnings into a […]

30 July 2020
‘Feeling’ Zachary Leo’s New Sound

In today’s age where the majority of mainstream music is filled with mind-numbing beats, Zachary Leo’s sound is a breath of fresh air. The 21-year-old Melbourne based artist began his journey in 2019 releasing the singles She and Lay You Down, and more recently released the extremely catchy single Not That Easy. Fresh off a […]

28 July 2020
Review: Henry Green’s ‘Half Light’ feels like waking up on a day off

Suffice to say that in the Year of Our Lord 2020, we’ve all had our fair share of emotional rollercoasters. There are moments when you feel inspired and in control, there are other moments when you feel anything but. Sometimes, it’s almost like you’re sleepwalking. From his attic studio, dream pop artist Henry Green has […]

6 July 2020
Review: Partition Voices

Bari is the Bengali word for one’s ancestral home; it is your desh, the place that always holds an important key to understanding who you are. For those uprooted – and often traumatised, as the people in this series of true stories often are – the idea of bari is a confusing one…

16 May 2020
Review: Goodbye, Elton John

This concert was 50 years in the making, and my goodness did it exceed my highly-set expectations! 
After performing in Melbourne multiple times throughout his long and successful career, Sir Elton John took his last bow on a Melbourne stage on Sunday 15th December. This 150th show of his Farewell Yellow Brick Road Tour was performed at a packed Rod Laver Arena, full to the brim of fans who were eagerly awaiting the chance to see Elton perform one last time.

17 March 2020
Review: The Hitmen

As a satire of job-hunting hell, The Hitmen struggles to strike its target. Nonetheless, Mish Wittrup’s new play offers some gory chuckles and a suite of energetic performances.

Review: Pollen Revolution @ Asia TOPA

Despite being younger than his mentors, Akira Kasai is considered to be one of the most established figures of butoh, starting his own studio in Japan–before studying Eurythmy (expressive movement art) in Germany. Kasai’s wide range of influences is evident in Pollen Revolution, brought for the first time to the Melbourne stage by Dancehouse Theatre.

3 March 2020
Review: Citizen K

Citizen K, directed and written by Alex Gibney, tells a side of the Cold War story that is arguably more interesting, and indeed more deadly, than the war itself: how does a nation with a communist backbone going back centuries suddenly make the transition to capitalism? How do its citizens get by? How does the government and its laws catch up to such an upheaval?

Review: The Professor and the Madman

In a constantly changing linguistic and cultural landscape Mel Gibson’s passion project based on the unique history of the Oxford English Dictionary, should have had no trouble capturing the modern zeitgeist. Unfortunately, in a production marred by chaos, lawsuits and general disfunction, The Professor and the Madman is a film left feeling hollow and unfinished.

25 February 2020
Review: Like A Boss @ Moonlight Cinema

Like A Boss had the potential to be a huge comedy hit because of its star-studded cast and emphasis on female empowerment, but it failed to do so. Starring Tiffany Haddish and Rose Byrne as best friends and Salma Hayek as the antagonist, the film heavily relies on innuendos and slapstick comedy in an attempt to be funny.

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