review

Review: Mental As Everything & Scarred For Life—Double Bill

Ultimately, audiences will come away with a better understanding of mental illnesses and what it means to live with them. Sitting in the dark, watching these shows, was an unmistakable sense of connection amongst the audience: alternating between moments of sympathy and of recognition. You either come away from these shows knowing more about mental health, or you leave thinking “Oh, so it’s not just me who feels like this”.

13 August 2018
Review: West of Sunshine

“It’s a film about Melbourne’s west, you should come with me,” I’d said to Tilly. It was a highly reductive summary, leaving out every single plot element, but it worked—the westside born-and-raised Morley sisters will go see anything that acknowledges our beloved western suburbs.

Review: Bloomsbury’s Guinea Pig Classics

As of December 2017, A Guinea Pig Romeo & Juliet was selling better on Amazon than the original version. All theory aside, people love Guinea Pig Classics. Arguably the best way to figure out why is to directly consult the consumers themselves. As I am not due to interact with any actual children in the week leading up to submitting this review, I read A Guinea Pig Romeo and Juliet to my friend after a few pints.  “Omg little butt”, she says, and “soooooo worried, oh nooo”. I think she’s referring to the fact that all of the little guinea pig faces look generally really concerned and bug-eyed, which is objectively hilarious when they’re ALL WEARING HATS and framed with such captions as My only love sprung from my only hate! / Too early seen unknown, and known too late!  Bloomsbury’s editor Xa Shaw Stewart says that this is the key to the series’ success: “Guinea pigs are just so funny—they are so earnest and serious. They always look a tiny bit worried. When you set an incredible text against a really worried little face, something magical happens.”

6 August 2018
Review: Leave No Trace

After eight long years, the genius that is Debra Granik returns with a feature film that is as beautiful a piece of unhurried filmmaking as Winter’s Bone was. Leave No Trace—an adaptation of the novel, My Abandonment by Peter Rock—follows Will, an army veteran, and Tom, his thirteen year old daughter, who call home a little camp set-up made of tarps and other equipment in the wilderness of a nature reserve in Oregon.

Review: C’est La Vie

If you’re looking for originality, you won’t find much of it in C’est La Vie where pretty much every character is a silly caricature. But although it relies heavily on tropes, it does so with charm and humour.

1 August 2018
Review: Fury at the Red Stitch Actors’ Theatre

Within the intimately small theatre, one feels enveloped by Fury’s storm. The play digs into the fracture lines across society’s conscience—immigration, privilege and racism. The characters collide, ideologically and even physically at times, fraying the audience’s nerves. Yet when the curtain falls, one is left with not only a quickly-beating heart, but also, with a new perspective.

15 June 2018
Review: Puffs the Play

There have been some Harry Potter parodies and spinoffs that have become so famous they’ve almost become compulsory viewing for HP fans–the Potter Puppet Pals and A Very Potter Musical series are a couple that come to mind. But Puffs is the first to tell the story of, well, the Puffs, who just happened to be there when that boy with the lightning scar decided to turn up and bring trouble with him.

8 June 2018
Review: On Body and Soul / Testről és lélekről

CONTENT WARNING: mild discussion of gore, killing of animals. A story of two individuals navigating the complexities of emotions and intimacy, On Body and Soul (Testről és lélekről) is a moving film for anyone who has ever felt alone. Expertly weaving multiple layers of meaning together, Hungarian director Ildikó Enyedi has created a masterpiece which reflects on the human condition within modern society. This film also made me uncomfortable – and so it should.

30 April 2018