Culture

Review: I’m Like a Puppy, You Need to Train Me

Bethany Cherry’s debut feature, chronicling the daily routine at the Farrago office, raises one major concern: can one woman truly drink that much tea?

23 March 2020
Review: Goodbye, Elton John

This concert was 50 years in the making, and my goodness did it exceed my highly-set expectations! 
After performing in Melbourne multiple times throughout his long and successful career, Sir Elton John took his last bow on a Melbourne stage on Sunday 15th December. This 150th show of his Farewell Yellow Brick Road Tour was performed at a packed Rod Laver Arena, full to the brim of fans who were eagerly awaiting the chance to see Elton perform one last time.

17 March 2020
Review: The Hitmen

As a satire of job-hunting hell, The Hitmen struggles to strike its target. Nonetheless, Mish Wittrup’s new play offers some gory chuckles and a suite of energetic performances.

17 March 2020
Review: Pollen Revolution @ Asia TOPA

Despite being younger than his mentors, Akira Kasai is considered to be one of the most established figures of butoh, starting his own studio in Japan–before studying Eurythmy (expressive movement art) in Germany. Kasai’s wide range of influences is evident in Pollen Revolution, brought for the first time to the Melbourne stage by Dancehouse Theatre.

3 March 2020
Review: Citizen K

Citizen K, directed and written by Alex Gibney, tells a side of the Cold War story that is arguably more interesting, and indeed more deadly, than the war itself: how does a nation with a communist backbone going back centuries suddenly make the transition to capitalism? How do its citizens get by? How does the government and its laws catch up to such an upheaval?

3 March 2020
Review: The Professor and the Madman

In a constantly changing linguistic and cultural landscape Mel Gibson’s passion project based on the unique history of the Oxford English Dictionary, should have had no trouble capturing the modern zeitgeist. Unfortunately, in a production marred by chaos, lawsuits and general disfunction, The Professor and the Madman is a film left feeling hollow and unfinished.

25 February 2020
Review: Like A Boss @ Moonlight Cinema

Like A Boss had the potential to be a huge comedy hit because of its star-studded cast and emphasis on female empowerment, but it failed to do so. Starring Tiffany Haddish and Rose Byrne as best friends and Salma Hayek as the antagonist, the film heavily relies on innuendos and slapstick comedy in an attempt to be funny.

25 February 2020
Review: Laneway Festival – Rock and roll is dead. God bless.

St Jerome’s Laneway Festival, known affectionately as ‘Laneway’, made the move from the concrete jungle of Footscray’s Community Arts Centre to the luscious wonderland of Footscray Park in 2019. The name celebrates the event’s roots as a boutique inner-city festival born in the back alleys of Lonsdale Street, but the 2020 rendition of Laneway Melbourne was a far cry from its modest beginnings. 

25 February 2020
Review: DreamWorks Animation: The Exhibition

Beginning as a celebration of the studio’s 20th anniversary, the collection of creative works on display has grown with each new film released in the late 2010’s, culminating in a behind-the-scenes peak at 37 animated features. Unlike a theme-park or premiere event, where the emphasis is placed upon the visitor and their interactions with film characters, DreamWorks Animation: The Exhibition is very much a celebration of the filmmakers and creative processes behind each film.  

12 February 2020
Review: The Last Free Man and Other Stories

I must say there is a strangely melancholic tinge when reading a book so heavily steeped in Australiana as you fly out of Australia. For a book like The Last Free Man, this culminates in the desire to stare out the window at the vastness of the Australian wilderness and for a brief moment be alone (blessedly, when one’s seat is in front of a small screaming child) as Jimmy Healy does in the opening story of the same name. 

12 February 2020
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