Books

Review: no visible bruises: what we don’t know about domestic violence can kill us

Snyder shines the light primarily on the American justice system as she breaks her book down into three sections “The End”, “The Beginning” and “The Middle”, which explore how we come to know about domestic abuse and how it can be born.

8 September 2020
Review: Something That May Shock and Discredit You

Daniel M. Lavery: Something That May Shock and Discredit You Scribe Publications, 2020. ISBN, 9781922310040, pp. 256, $29.99   Something That May Shock and Discredit You is a work that is incredibly comforting for a trans reader. It is, at its heart, a sincere exercise in reckoning with what ‘trans’ is, for a trans person, […]

20 August 2020
Review: We Are Family: what really matters for parents and children

Susan Golombrok: We are family: what really matters for parents and children Scribe Publications, 2020. ISBN, 9781925713701pp. 320 , $32.99   Professor Susan Golombrok has spent years researching families and how they have changed in the 21st century. From queer couples being able to adopt to Kim Kardashian surrogacies, Golombrok packages her learnings into a […]

30 July 2020
Review: Partition Voices

Bari is the Bengali word for one’s ancestral home; it is your desh, the place that always holds an important key to understanding who you are. For those uprooted – and often traumatised, as the people in this series of true stories often are – the idea of bari is a confusing one…

16 May 2020
Review: The Last Free Man and Other Stories

I must say there is a strangely melancholic tinge when reading a book so heavily steeped in Australiana as you fly out of Australia. For a book like The Last Free Man, this culminates in the desire to stare out the window at the vastness of the Australian wilderness and for a brief moment be alone (blessedly, when one’s seat is in front of a small screaming child) as Jimmy Healy does in the opening story of the same name. 

12 February 2020
Review: The Bride Test

The Bride Test is a really pure novel. It explores the intricacies of family, immigration, mental health, grief and so much more.

16 September 2019
Review: Normal People

In this sense, Normal People isn’t a groundbreaking story. It’s a story about all of these things—life, love, change, and coexistence—about which story after story have already been written. It grounds these ideas in four turbulent years of late adolescence and early adulthood, imperfect and unforgettable all at the same time.

24 July 2019
Review: The Selected Works of Abdullah the Cossack

I would say that H.M. Naqvi knows a lot of words. He, or at least his protagonist Abdullah, would prefer I call him verbose. Or maybe not even that. What about bombastic, magniloquent, fustian? If you had to look up any of those then you would know how I felt reading Naqvi’s second novel, The Selected Works of Abdullah the Cossack, a sprawling romp through Abdullah’s beloved city of Currachee, Pakistan. You would also realise that verbose and fustian don’t necessarily connote positive vibes. After all, one person’s flowery is another person’s windy. Say you’re the type of reader who wants a break from the vocabulary of your chosen field of study, and would rather not be confronted with footnotes in their leisure reading, the question then becomes, is it worth it?

6 June 2019
Review: Tales From Moominvalley and Moominvalley in November

Moomins are really having their day in the sun, and have been ever since Tove Jansson received her first letter from a business trying to trademark Little My for children’s period-training underpants. In Melbourne, you can buy random objects with their faces on them from Uniqlo, Miniso and every sort of artist’s market. Little My’s been the Twitter avi of the current Voiceworks Editor-in-Chief for as long as I can remember, and I have a turquoise portable phone charger with Moomintroll on a pogo stick on it.

11 January 2019
Review: From Dawn to Dusk, New Sun Poems where Beveridge Rises

Beveridge begins with a sunrise of colours that melt across the page, however the middle half of her collection felt gloomy and the divide between Wolf Notes and Storm and Honey was strong and jarring. But to watch her poems adapt and to feel a sense of accomplishment, that’s something I want to learn from.

5 December 2018
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