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Books

Review: Bloomsbury’s Guinea Pig Classics

As of December 2017, A Guinea Pig Romeo & Juliet was selling better on Amazon than the original version. All theory aside, people love Guinea Pig Classics. Arguably the best way to figure out why is to directly consult the consumers themselves. As I am not due to interact with any actual children in the week leading up to submitting this review, I read A Guinea Pig Romeo and Juliet to my friend after a few pints.  “Omg little butt”, she says, and “soooooo worried, oh nooo”. I think she’s referring to the fact that all of the little guinea pig faces look generally really concerned and bug-eyed, which is objectively hilarious when they’re ALL WEARING HATS and framed with such captions as My only love sprung from my only hate! / Too early seen unknown, and known too late!  Bloomsbury’s editor Xa Shaw Stewart says that this is the key to the series’ success: “Guinea pigs are just so funny—they are so earnest and serious. They always look a tiny bit worried. When you set an incredible text against a really worried little face, something magical happens.”

6 August 2018
Review: Flood Damages by Eunice Andrada

Ultimately, as an award-winning poet and lyricist with experience performing her work on the internationally stage, Andrada is no stranger to dissecting and distributing the personal to the audience. Although the book will likely be more poignant for anyone who has gone through similar experiences to Andrada, I would almost encourage you to read the book even more if you have nothing in common with her. Flood Damages is a perfect opportunity to see the world through a different pair of eyes, so you can compare it with, and reflect on your own reality.

2 July 2018
Bone House Scott Laudati
‘Bone House’, the Light in a Broken Alley

When the world has constantly been exposed to the likes of Instagram poets, it can be incredibly difficult to find poignant writing that delivers something else, a level of almost distress, tinged with the encouragement to live out your life as best you can.

7 May 2018
A Little Crease of Comfort

I’m strangely comforted by the hardcover casing of Darby Hudson’s WALK.

Voldemort - Cathy Chen
Harry Potter and the Magic of Medicine

Despite Harry Potter being a magical universe where logic need not apply, some elements are closer to science fiction than true magic: Tessa Marshall writes.

2 April 2018
Review: Lyrically Looming, Jennifer Mills’ Dyschronia

Dyschronia is not a book I would have initially picked up, however upon reading it, it has opened new ways of considering the world for myself.

6 February 2018
Review: Clunes Booktown Festival

There really is nothing like the look and feel of a good book: you can smell the authenticity of each page, and feel the creases and textures in the paper. This love of books is the reason that Clunes Booktown Festival is now in its 11th year, and still going strong.

29 May 2017
Review: Men

I picked up Men because the blurb proclaimed it to be an exploration of ‘female desire’. I was expecting irony. I was disappointed.

9 May 2016
Review: The Argonauts

The Argonauts details her experiences of being a step-parent, giving birth and sharing with her partner in their grief after their mother’s death.

4 May 2016
The Future of Books

The future of books is a strange and scary place that most Arts students prefer not to think about.

25 February 2016