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Why the Left Sucks: An Inquiry into Campus’s Most Hated Political Group

It is no exaggeration to say that The University of Melbourne is one of the largest breeding grounds for leftist thought in the country. For those of us who have been on campus–walked past the columns

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Poor Selina, she had to watch the whole debate.

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The discourse accusing this so-called ‘student aesthetic’ of fetishising poorness has surfaced within the past year on social media (especially TikTok) and in conversations between students on and off

Satire: Farrago Shuts Down; Honi Soit Now Australia's Oldest Student Publication

As of today, Farrago Magazine, Australia’s oldest student publication, will cease operations under the current four editors.

VCA Students Demand UniMelb to Commit to “Zero Tolerance” Policy

Students at the Victorian College of the Arts (VCA) are calling on the University of Melbourne to “commit to stronger policies and actions when it comes to sexual assault”, after the University ignore

 

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Your Brain and Social Rejection

<p>Ever wondered why people say they feel ‘hurt’ by others’ comments? Or why we refer to losing in love as having our heart ‘broken’? These little language quirks have evolutionary origins which have made us desperate for affection. We are hardwired to need to be included. Back when humans lived in hunter-gatherer societies, being in [&hellip;]</p>

Ever wondered why people say they feel ‘hurt’ by others’ comments? Or why we refer to losing in love as having our heart ‘broken’? These little language quirks have evolutionary origins which have made us desperate for affection.

We are hardwired to need to be included. Back when humans lived in hunter-gatherer societies, being in a group provided protection, food and shelter. So being rejected from the group almost certainly meant imminent death. It sounds a bit dramatic these days, but because the stakes were so high, humans became very good at detecting when rejection may occur so that rejected persons have a chance to regain status in the group.

The detection mechanism for rejection is psychological pain. And yes, it is literal pain. There is evidence to suggest that when experiencing either physical or psychological pain, the same centres in the brain activate. These structures are called the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the anterior insula (AI). fMRI studies have shown these areas light up even when people are excluded from a computer program in a virtual game of catch. The more intense the feeling of rejection, the higher the levels of activity in the dACC and the AI. It has also been shown that the surgical creation of a lesion in part of the dACC can be used as a treatment for people suffering from chronic pain, thus showing the dACC’s role in physical pain. People treated in this manner can locate the pain sensation, but leaves them unbothered by the feeling of pain.

Despite rejection not having the same risk as it did about a hundred thousand years ago, our strong response to rejection continues even today. It explains why we describe our feelings as being ‘hurt’, or our heart being ‘broken’, as well as the rampant fear of public speaking. Being viewed negatively by our peers literally hurts us. So go easy on your fellow human beings as well as yourself, we’re a tad fragile!

 
Farrago's magazine cover - Edition Four 2022

EDITION FOUR 2022 AVAILABLE NOW!

Saddle up! Farrago’s brand spanking new edition is here! It’s jam-packed with art, photography, news, non-fiction and creative writing; and it calls on you to “be the cowboy.” “But what does that mean?” you ask. Well, let the wise words of Mitski guide you… ”What would a swaggering cowboy riding into town do in this situation?”

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