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Review: The Sound of Falling Stars at the Arts Centre

<p>The Sound of Falling Stars brings back memories of the American stars of the post-World War Two era through a few great role-playing scenes by Cameron Goodall and the two playful musicians, George Butrumlis and Enio Pozzebon.</p>

The Sound of Falling Stars brings back memories of the American stars of the post-World War Two era through a few great role-playing scenes by Cameron Goodall and the two playful musicians, George Butrumlis and Enio Pozzebon.

Starting off with a skit, Cameron Goodall was able to set the lonely atmosphere for Elvis Presley’s ‘Are You Lonesome Tonight?’, leaving the audience with that romantic question. He proceeded with other songs, where the tones got deeper and the pace was accelerated. The smooth shift in the pace and tone was really relaxing and enjoyable, and it meant that the show seemed too quick to end. We wanted even more!

Besides tonal shifts, Cameron made great interactions with the whole audience and the two musicians. He had strong body gestures that resembles each singer’s personality that he impersonated. He took serious attention to the way each singer dressed themselves back then, so that we could feel that they were once again on the stage, bringing in their songs that night. The two musicians were playing along well with Cameron too. They were able to set the mood so well that they blended in easily with the nostalgic atmosphere. Besides this, there was great attention paid to the details about the historical events that they wanted to revive on the stage.

The show lasted for one and a half hours with thoughtful management of each scene. Cameron was able to sink in each artist’s personality and reveal their dark secrets and thoughts about life to the audience, as well as their background stories. For example, there were a few singers that lived a lonely life. The show, in the big picture, basically revolved around diets, love, cocaine, Christianity and death. It was for this sake that both America and Paris were mentioned, where romanticism was in the air during 1965. Cameron succeeded in showing each singer’s personality and habits to the audience. Some singers fell into drug use, others fell in love, all to the background of other public figures like Martin Luther King and the ‘60s social movements.

 
Farrago's magazine cover - Edition Three 2021

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