LATEST NEWS:

"Please don’t ask if we’ve tried yoga”: Students fighting for disability support

Despite the University’s push to make learning accessible, through programs such as SEDS and Access Melbourne, there have yet to be endorsements from students that these programs are appropriate. Inst

Cinemas Buckle Under the Weight of the Netflix Empire

Will Hollywood blockbuster-type films continue to use Netflix as their outlet, or will they return to their rightful spot on the big screen?

Stop the Liberals, Join the Campaign against the Robert Menzies Institute!

The federal government, led by the Liberal Party, is bludgeoning universities. Since the onset of the pandemic, they have excluded thousands of university workers from JobKeeper, ramped up fees for se

Fangirls and Fantasies: Why we Love to Hate Twilight

It’s 2008: the era of galaxy-print leggings and Club Penguin. The radio incessantly plays Katy Perry’s ‘I Kissed A Girl’ and ‘Viva La Vida’ by Coldplay. Lounging on your bed after school, you flip thr

Petition Calls for Review of "Transphobic" Melbourne University Subject

(content warning: transphobia) A petition has been launched by the University of Melbourne Student Union (UMSU) Queer Political Action Collective calling for the review of the second year Winter Philo

 

Article

Review: Lennon—Through a Glass Onion

<p>There were no wigs, no glasses, and no beard. John R. Waters gave the audience an impeccable performance. He performed John Lennon’s classics while telling us a deeply felt reflection of the man without it leaning too much towards an impersonation of Lennon. </p>

There were no wigs, no glasses, and no beard. John R. Waters gave the audience an impeccable performance. He performed John Lennon’s classics while telling us a deeply felt reflection of the man without it leaning too much towards an impersonation of Lennon. Lennon: Through a Glass Onion is a musical biography that introduces us to John Lennon’s life. This includes the breakup, resentment towards Yoko Ono, his rivalry with Paul McCartney, his visit to the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, and much more.

The simple stage setup is occupied by only a piano and a mike stand. Stewart D’Arrietta accompanies Mr. Waters on stage and gives us an unforgettable performance. Mr D’Arrietta instrumentally holds the performance together and provides a series of piano effects along with singing. On the surface, this seems like a fairly straightforward performance. But by looking deeper into it, the audience can see that it is not just a musical biography about John Lennon, but more so how Lennon’s emotional reactions tie in with his significant life events.

The show begins when the lights go dark, and five shots are heard. Mr D’Arrietta performs a throwback to Lennon’s childhood, singing ‘Overture—Scouser’s Lament’ and ‘Liverpool Lullaby’. The stage then welcomes Mr Waters who sings a mind-blowing rendition of ‘A Day in The Life’. Mr Waters has been performing his John Lennon tribute since 1992 and it is easy to see why it still continues to appeal up till now. He gets the essence, right to the core of Lennon’s heart and soul.

John Lennon was a multi talented man. He was a pop star, musician, writer, activist, teacher, and so much more. Lennon: Through a Glass Onion captured every single facet of his short but incredibly rich life. The two-hour long show closed off with a rousing rendition of ‘Imagine’, one of Lennon’s most well known classics, which was a good way to end the highly intimate evening. Through the personal and grand performance by Mr Waters and Mr D’Arrietta, we get a glimpse at Lennon’s life and spirit.

 

John Lennon: Through a Glass Onion was performed at the Arts Centre Melbourne’s Playhouse Theatre.

 
Farrago's magazine cover - Edition Three 2021

FARRAGO MAGAZINE EDITIONS FIVE AND SIX AVAILABLE NOW!

Our final editions for the year are jam packed full of news, culture, photography, poetry, art, fiction and more...

Read online