LATEST NEWS:

"Please don’t ask if we’ve tried yoga”: Students fighting for disability support

Despite the University’s push to make learning accessible, through programs such as SEDS and Access Melbourne, there have yet to be endorsements from students that these programs are appropriate. Inst

Cinemas Buckle Under the Weight of the Netflix Empire

Will Hollywood blockbuster-type films continue to use Netflix as their outlet, or will they return to their rightful spot on the big screen?

Stop the Liberals, Join the Campaign against the Robert Menzies Institute!

The federal government, led by the Liberal Party, is bludgeoning universities. Since the onset of the pandemic, they have excluded thousands of university workers from JobKeeper, ramped up fees for se

Fangirls and Fantasies: Why we Love to Hate Twilight

It’s 2008: the era of galaxy-print leggings and Club Penguin. The radio incessantly plays Katy Perry’s ‘I Kissed A Girl’ and ‘Viva La Vida’ by Coldplay. Lounging on your bed after school, you flip thr

Petition Calls for Review of "Transphobic" Melbourne University Subject

(content warning: transphobia) A petition has been launched by the University of Melbourne Student Union (UMSU) Queer Political Action Collective calling for the review of the second year Winter Philo

 

Article

Review: Red Noodle Blue

<p>What happens when the director of your comedy show is a pool noodle and he goes missing in the space-time continuum? It’s not a question I ever imagined asking myself, but Red Noodle Blue does just that and somehow, even more?</p>

What happens when the director of your comedy show is a pool noodle and he goes missing in the space-time continuum? It’s not a question I ever imagined asking myself, but Red Noodle Blue does just that and somehow, even more?

Paul the red pool noodle, being crushed under the pressure of his strenuous PhD in Bioethics, is undergoing an identity crisis: he no longer wants to be red, but blue. To rescue their friend from his own self-doubt, Jacob and Jack (Unimelb alumni Jacob Sacher and Jack McGorlick) embark on a wild adventure which moves seamlessly between renaissance Italy, 1939 Germany, the present day and more. On the way, they will encounter the fragility of time-travel, meet their match in the form of two particularly thirsty Brunswick theatre performers and hurl constant abuse at their tech-guy Sandro, lover of Sunbury, 7-11 and the underground rap scene.

And yes; it is just as wonderful as it sounds.

For my first comedy experience, I couldn’t have asked for anything more. Despite their younger(er) ages, Sacher and McGorlick are clearly experienced performers. Their stage presence is immediately natural, always hilarious and never overdone. Whether the pair are exploring the awkward or the bizarre; from bumping around in a cardboard time machine to employing their sauciest flirting techniques on Sandro, the audience is forced to balance complete enrapturement while trying not to fall from their chairs in snorting laughter.

I said to my friend before the show that I hoped the stereotype of comedians calling out audience members wasn’t true. Naturally I found out first-hand that it is. Expecting to be plummeted back to my cringey improv performance in Grade 8 Drama, I was pleasantly surprised. Never fear, my fellow awkward people! If Sacher and McGorlick call you up, you can rest assured that they’re just as comfortable not following a script as they are with one. Their relationship with the audience is easy-going and established from the get-go, and for me the mood was only heightened by the intimacy of the historic Tasma Terrace venue.

So, whether you’re a novice or a veteran of the Melbourne comedy scene, I couldn’t recommend Red Noodle Blue enough. For these two, time machines and pool noodles are clearly just the beginning.

 
Farrago's magazine cover - Edition Three 2021

FARRAGO MAGAZINE EDITIONS FIVE AND SIX AVAILABLE NOW!

Our final editions for the year are jam packed full of news, culture, photography, poetry, art, fiction and more...

Read online