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A Very Condensed Impression of the Registered Parties: Electric Boogaloo

We're back for round 2!

Content warning: This article includes slight references to queerphobia, abortion, and pornography.

 

This is part 2 of a short summary of the 38 registered parties for this Federal Election. Last time, we covered the parties that currently make up parliament.

Do note that on top of parties, you will also likely have some independent candidates on your ballot (individuals who don’t have a party). If you want to find out who your local independents are (which we won’t go through since they vary considerably by state and electorate)—you can do that (and more) here!

Without further ado, let’s get into it.

 

Animal Justice Party: A party that is, comfortingly, exactly what it sounds like. Their primary goal is to improve animal protection and conservation legislation in Australia, and they have policies and positions on basically everything you can think of that relates to animal welfare, which definitely colours how they vote on other issues—all their policies are brought back to animal rights. That being said, some of their policies (like their brumby policy, and their position on eradicating lethal control) may be contentious in some communities, particularly rural areas. They have senate candidates for every state and a few house of reps candidates too.

 

Australian Christians: Allegedly Christian. This party wants to protect kids from porn! They also seem to want you to go to anti-abortion rallies. Aaaand they don’t support safe schools. If you want a good old nihilistic laugh, read their policy on carbon tax. In other news, they have nine lower house candidates and two for the senate.

 

Australian Citizens Party: They have the nerve to use the American spelling for their party name. The Big ThingTM that they seem to be concerned about is making the postal service also a bank. They’re also anti-war, pro One-China policy—and have a bunch of other policies you can check out. Here are their candidates if you want a squiz.

 

Australian Democrats: A (sort of) centrist minor party which actually has had sitting senators before! I say sort of as they have policies that may stray to either side of the political spectrum. Dissolved in 2016 but came back in 2019 after merging with Country Minded, a regional and agriculturally based party. They have an emphasis on anti-conflict and seem to be ostensibly quite progressive. The president of this party is former senator Lyn Allison. 

 

Australian Federation Party: One of the ones whose name does not give a clear impression of what they’re about. Their main aim appears to be getting directly involved with the communities they represent; holding monthly meetings and not voting in line with their own policy if there is public disagreement on it at the meetings. Unfortunately, they believe the pandemic’s magnitude was exaggerated, “up to 50 times”, and that the major parties are adopting legislation straight from communist China, compromising the economy and defence. Hi, um, yeah can I get uhhh a simple political party please?? No? You’re fresh out?? Damn, that’s too bad. 

 

Australian Progressives: Who’d have guessed, a socially progressive party. These peeps want a commission against corruption! That sounds pretty neat. Who likes corruption? They also want to end poverty. They have a reasonable sounding climate policy. They are one of a few parties on this list that have an Acknowledgement of Country on their website, something which one of the major parties (cough cough I wonder which one) doesn’t seem to have! How interesting!! They don’t have many candidates though, only six in total; four for the senate and two for the electorates of Ryan and Sturt.

 

Australian Values Party: This party is a spring chicken—only formed in 2021 by Heston Russell, a former special forces major and veteran. The party has a big focus on defence related issues, which… makes sense. Self-identify as centrist, assessing information from both sides. They have ten candidates.

 

Country Liberal Party (NT): A NT party, who really doesn’t seem to like Labor. They also seem to really like the Coalition; I've never read so many references to another party’s policies within party policies. They’re big on increasing economic and health opportunities in the NT, but they also have a big emphasis on strengthening crime control, among other issues. Another party which seems to have prioritised economic policy over say, oh I don’t know, literally any climate policy?! But, hey, who needs climate policy when you’ve got stonks from all those jobs right?!

 

That's nine! Only a few left to go. We've got this.

 
Farrago's magazine cover - Edition Five 2022

EDITION SIX 'RETROFUTURISM' AVAILABLE NOW!

Our last print edition of 2022 is here! This wild, visionary edition is filled with burning nostalgia, glittering hope, and tantalising visions of the future, past, and present.

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